[93] Black consciousness became the prevailing subject matter of many hip hop acts, exemplified by X-Clan's cultural nationalism on their debut album To the East, Blackwards, the revolutionary, Black Panther-minded The Devil Made Me Do It by Paris, and the Five Percenter religious nationalism of Poor Righteous Teachers' debut Holy Intellect. Sometimes, on the sound sheet, we have to have a separate sheet just to list the samples for each track. "They're figuring out how to jam with the samples and to create these layers of sound," Chang said. Fear of a Blank Planet is the ninth studio album by British progressive rock band Porcupine Tree and their best selling before 2009's The Incident.It was released on 16 April 2007 in the UK and the rest of Europe by Roadrunner, 24 April 2007 in the United States by Atlantic, 25 April 2007 in Japan by WHD, and 1 May 2007 in Canada by WEA. [19] This preceded the legal limits and clearance costs later placed on sampling,[29] which limited hip hop production and the complexity of its musical arrangements. Chuck was like, 'Record that shit man'". The message and delivery from Chuck D is as intelligent and professional as possible and his powerful voice is supported by equally powerful tracks. "[94] Their music on the album inspired leftist and Afrocentric ideals among rap listeners who were previously exposed to more materialist themes in the music. [36], According to The Greenwood Encyclopedia of African American Folklore (2006), Fear of a Black Planet introduced a production style that "borrowed elements from jazz, especially that of John Coltrane, to craft a soundscape that was more challenging than that of their previous two albums, but still complemented the complex social commentary". The track features dizzying, internal rhyme schemes by Chuck D and has been described by one music writer as "a complete sonic apocalypse". Most of My Heroes Still Don't Appear on No Stamp. "[19] Hank Shocklee called it "a production assembly line where each person had their own particular specialty ... [Shocklee] came from a DJ's perspective. [41] The title track discusses racial classification and the origins of Whites fearing African Americans, particularly racist concerns by some Whites over the effect of miscegenation. [37] Chuck D said it was their most successful record, "not because of all the hype and hysteria. It was a world record. [101] In the opinion of Kembrew McLeod, Public Enemy had worked with production equipment that would seem primitive decades later but still managed to invent new "techniques and workarounds that electronics manufacturers never imagined". [13][43] He is also critical of Blacks and those who "blame somebody else when you destroy yourself": "Every brother ain't a brother / 'cause a Black hand squeezed on Malcolm X the man / the shootin of Huey Newton / from the hand of Nig who pulled the trigger". The album is selling across the board to all demographics and nationalities". [6] Their music's dense textures, provided by the group's production team The Bomb Squad, exemplified a new production aesthetic in hip hop. [17], To follow up It Takes a Nation of Millions to Hold Us Back, the group sought to make a more thematically focused work and to condense Dr. Frances Cress Welsing's theory of "Color Confrontation and Racism (White Supremacy)" into an album-length recording. [76] After 1991, when the tracking system Nielsen SoundScan began tracking domestic sales data, Fear of a Black Planet sold 561,000 additional copies by 2010. But it really shoulda been much better. The sounds, beats,ideas, and moods created on this album create a totally cohesive body of work. 00:00 Fear of a Blank Planet07:29 My Ashes12:35 Anesthetize30:17 Sentimental35:45 Way Out of Here43:22 Sleep Together Mark Dery et al. [8], It Takes a Nation's success helped raise hip hop's profile as both art and sociopolitical statement, amid media criticism of the genre. [37] Journalist Kembrew McLeod called the music "both agitprop and pop, mixing politics with the live-wire thrill of the popular music experience", adding that the Bomb Squad "took sampling to the level of high art while keeping intact hip hop's populist heart. [62] The humorous and satirical subject matter is reflected in the song's accompanying music video, which features a severely injured Flav being mistreated by a remiss, overdue ambulance staff. At that time, black hip-hop artists, for the most part, had photos of themselves on their covers. [6] Chuck D wrote most of the song attempting to adapt The Isley Brothers' "Fight the Power" to a modernist perspective. [20], ^shipments figures based on certification alone, We wanted to create a new sound out of the assemblage of sounds that made us have our own identity. Fear of a Black Planet is about achieving that understanding, but on Public Enemy's terms. But this was the first time someone took a chance to do something in the rock'n'roll vein". They would graft together dozens of fragmentary samples to create a single song collage. [92], Fear of a Black Planet also helped popularize political subject matter in hip hop music,[13] as it epitomized the resurgence in black consciousness among African-American youths at the turn of the 1990s, amid a turbulent social and political zeitgeist during the Bush administration and South African apartheid. [38] Chicago Tribune critic Greg Kot felt that with the album, "Public Enemy affirms that it is not just a great rap group, but one of the best rock bands on the planet-black or otherwise". And the group has made pop music that is vital in the contemporary debate about race in American culture for the first time since the 1960s, when. "[44], The opening track, "Contract on the World Love Jam", is a sound collage made up of samples, scratch cuts,[47] and snippets recorded by Chuck D from radio stations and sound bites of interviews and commercials. "[19] Sadler's approach was more traditional and structured, while Shocklee's was more experimental. A commercial and critical hit, Fear of a Black Planet sold two million copies in the United States and received rave reviews from critics, many of whom named it one of the year's best albums. [28], Fear of a Black Planet was conceived during the golden age of hip hop, a period roughly between 1987 and 1992 when artists took advantage of emerging sampling technology before record labels and lawyers took notice. Shop Public Enemy - Fear of a Black Planet LP at Urban Outfitters today. challenges listeners to step into their world. [63], In The Washington Post, Richard Harrington said because Fear of a Black Planet is a challenging listen, "How it's met depends on how it's understood. "[13] Simon Reynolds of Melody Maker remarked that the content epitomizes the group's significance at the time: "Public Enemy are important ... because of the angry questions that seethe in their music, in the very fabric of their sound; the bewilderment and rage that, in this case, have made for one hell of strong, scary album". We knew that the door on sampling was gonna close". Fear of a Black Planet is the third studio album by American hip hop group Public Enemy. [116], In 2004, the Library of Congress added Fear of a Black Planet to the National Recording Registry, which selects recordings annually that are "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant". [108] The following year, it was selected as one of The Source's 100 Best Rap Albums. Fear of a Black Planet is truly an album where all the parts come together like a Masters Thesis. Are these tracks instrumental or different than the album versions in any way? [94] Reeves said it introduced black consciousness to the "hip-hop youth" of the "post-black power generation", "as leather African medallions made popular by rappers like P.E. [62] Another Flavor Flav-solo performance, "Can't Do Nuttin' for Ya Man", has lyrics advocating African-American self-reliance and denouncing welfare dependence. [45] Several other samples are heard amid Chuck D's rapping, such as the line "come on, you can get it-get it-get it" from Instant Funk's "I Got My Mind Made Up (You Can Get It Girl)". [47] According to Chuck D, the song features "about forty-five to fifty [sampled] voices" that interweave as part of an assertive sonic collage and underscore the themes explored on subsequent tracks. I was slipping. [18] In an interview for Westword, he later said, "We understood the magnitude of what an album was, so we set out to make something that not only epitomized the standard of an album, but would stand the test of time by being diverse with sounds and textures, and also being able to home in on the aspect of peaks and valleys". [86] It was named the second best album of the year by The Boston Globe,[87] the third best by USA Today,[88] and fifth best by the Los Angeles Times's Robert Hilburn, who wrote that it "dissects aspects of the black experience with an energy and vision that illustrates why rap continues to be the most creative genre in pop". Recorded during the golden age of hip hop, its assemblage of reconfigured and recontextualized aural sources preceded the sample clearance system that later emerged in the music industry. [91], Fear of a Black Planet's success with critics and consumers was viewed as a significant factor to hip hop's mainstream emergence in 1990, which Billboard editor Paul Grein said was "the year that rap exploded". Public Enemy :: Fear of a Black Planet :: Def Jam ** RapReviews "Back to the Lab" series ** as reviewed by Steve 'Flash' Juon This may seem like sacrilege to a lot of Public Enemy purists out there but "It Takes a Nation of Millions" was not my first P.E. [41] "Meet the G That Killed Me" features homophobic etiology and condemns homosexuality: "Man to man / I don't know if they can / From what I know / The parts don't fit". If we had more time and we didn't have to deal with the situation of nobody talking". Its success contributed significantly to the popularity of Afrocentric and political subject matter in hip hop and the genre's mainstream resurgence at the time. In promoting Fear of a Black Planet, he recruited young street crews to put up posters, billboards, and stickers on public surfaces,[67] while Simmons himself met with nightclub DJs and college radio program directors to persuade them to add albums tracks such as "Fight the Power", "Welcome to the Terrordome", and "911 Is a Joke" to their playlists. [28] Subsequent use of sampled material, particularly the use of whole songs on top of a beat, by other hip hop artists prompted stricter sampling laws. "[19] Simon Reynolds said it was "a work of unprecedented density for hip hop, its claustrophobic, backs-against-the-wall feel harking back to Sly Stone's There's a Riot Goin' On or even Miles Davis' On the Corner". In presenting their view of life from an Afro-centric, as opposed to Euro-centric, perspective, P.E. I do not own this song. [84] In a July 1990 article, Kot compared Public Enemy's influence on hip hop with the album at the start of the 1990s to the impact of Bob Dylan, George Clinton, and Bob Marley on each of their respective genres and eras, having "given it legitimacy and authority far beyond its core following". [107], All tracks were produced by The Bomb Squad. [83] After asserting prior to its release that it was "bound to be one of the most dissected pop collections in years",[11] Robert Hilburn of the Los Angeles Times wrote that the album "rivals the force and the power of It Takes a Nation" while "maintaining commercial and artistic credibility in the fast-changing rap world" with original music. It Takes a Nation of Millions to Hold Us Back, one of hip hop's greatest and most important records, The Greenwood Encyclopedia of African American Folklore, I Got My Mind Made Up (You Can Get It Girl), Christgau's Consumer Guide: Albums of the '90s, List of hip hop albums considered to be influential, "The Making of Ice Cube's "AmeriKKKa's Most Wanted, "The Top 100 Hip-Hop Albums of the '90s: 1990-1994 - 1. For me, that's 3 of the best things on this classic title, missing. Gold chains worn around the neck demean the brotherhood in South Africa. The sounds were all collaged together to make a sonic wall. [11] According to Sadler, "a lot of people were like, 'Wow, it's a brilliant album'. "I don't think it's been matched since then. : Rap Music's Rise to Prominence in the Aftershock of Black Power, Marcus Reeves said that Fear of a Black Planet "was as much a musical assault on America's racism as it was a call to blacks to effectively react to it". Def Jam Recordings – hãng ghi âm nổi tiếng chuyên về dòng nhạc hip-hop và urban – đã kết hợp cùng PUMA sáng tạo một bộ sưu tập vô cùng đặc biệt nhằm tôn vinh Public Enemy. [45] Among the samples used for the song are several James Brown tracks and the guitar line from The Temptations' "Psychedelic Shack". [45] AllMusic's John Bush cites the track as "the production peak of the Bomb Squad and one of Chuck D.'s best rapping performances ever ... [N]one of their tracks were more musically incendiary". [19] Accordingly, Public Enemy were not compelled to obtain sample clearance for the album. [12], In May 1989, Chuck D, Bomb Squad producer Hank Shocklee, and publicist Bill Stepheny were negotiating with several labels for a production deal from a major record company, their goal since starting Public Enemy in the early 1980s. Hip hop does not simply draw inspiration from a range of samples, but it layers these fragments into an artistic object. "[19] Shocklee compared their production to filmmaking, "with different lighting effects, or film speeds, or whatever", while Chuck D analogized to an artist creating green from yellow and blue. [13] The song features a vocal sample of comedian and activist Dick Gregory saying, "Black man, black woman, black baby / white man, black woman, black baby?". In 2003, Fear of a Black Planet was ranked number 300 on Rolling Stone's list of the 500 greatest albums of all time. [20], Credits are adapted from the album's liner notes. I was roasting. Power to the People and the Beats: Public Enemy's Greatest Hits, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Fear_of_a_Black_Planet&oldid=996321343, United States National Recording Registry recordings, Short description is different from Wikidata, Album articles lacking alt text for covers, Certification Table Entry usages for Canada, Pages using certification Table Entry with shipments figures, Certification Table Entry usages for United Kingdom, Certification Table Entry usages for United States, Pages using certification Table Entry with shipments footnote, Wikipedia articles with MusicBrainz release group identifiers, Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License, "Final Count of the Collision Between Us and the Damned", "Brothers Gonna Work It Out (Remix)" – 5:51, "Brothers Gonna Work It Out (Dub)" – 5:10, "Welcome to the Terrordome (Terrormental)" – 3:38, "Can't Do Nuttin' for Ya Man (Full Rub Mix)" – 4:44, "Can't Do Nuttin' for Ya Man (U.K. 12" Powermix)" – 4:06, "Can't Do Nuttin' for Ya Man (Dub Mixx)" – 4:03, "Burn Hollywood Burn (Extended Censored Fried to the Radio Version)" – 3:42, "Anti-Nigger Machine (Uncensored Extended)" – 1:59, "Power to the People (Instrumental)" – 2:42, "Revolutionary Generation (Instrumental)" – 5:46, "Fight the Power (Soundtrack Version)" – 5:23, "Fight the Power (Flavor Flav Meets Spike Lee)" – 4:34, "The Enemy Assault Vehicle Mixx (Medley)" – 9:25, Chuck D – arranger, director, producer, rapper, sequencing, Alan "JJ/Scott" Plotkin – engineer, mixing, vocals, Eric "Vietnam" Sadler – arranger, director, programming, producer, sequencing, Hank Shocklee – arranger, director, producer, sequencing, Keith Shocklee – arranger, director, producer, sequencing, This page was last edited on 25 December 2020, at 21:58. Listen free to Public Enemy – Fear of a Black Planet (Contract on the World Love Jam, Brothers Gonna Work It Out and more). [107] In 1997, The Guardian ranked it number 50 on their 100 Best Albums Ever list, which was voted on by a panel of various artists, critics, and DJs. [16][39] "Revolutionary Generation" celebrates the strength and endurance of black women with lyrics related to black feminism,[43] an unfamiliar topic in contemporary hip hop. [21] In a 1990 interview, Chuck added, "We approach every record like it was a painting. P.E. [68] Ruben Rodriguez, Columbia's senior vice president at the time, said in one of the label's press releases, "What's happening with Public Enemy is unbelievable. Can anybody tell me what track E3 is? Sad to say I got sold down the river / Still some quiver when I deliver / Never to say I never knew or had a clue / Word was heard, plus hard on the boulevard / Lies, scandalizin', basin' / Traits of hate who's celebratin' wit Satan?". "[50] Peter Watrous of The New York Times called it "an essential pop album" and stated, "On their own, the lyrics seen [sic] functional. Mark Dery et al. [45], "Burn Hollywood Burn" assails the use of black stereotypes in movies, while "Who Stole the Soul?" [81], Fear of a Black Planet was met with rave reviews from critics. Not even in the heyday of [the] Clash has any group come so close to the elusive and perhaps ridiculous '60s rock ideal of raising political consciousness with music. Critic John Nagle asks the eternal question: Why hasn’t heavy metal gained validity as an adult genre? [26] Chuck D remarked that "95 percent of the time it sounded like mess. View credits, reviews, tracks and shop for the 2018 Vinyl release of Fear Of A Black Planet on Discogs. The Enemy Strikes Black (1991), which featured more critical assessments of African-Americans, denouncing Black drug dealers who donned Afrocentric merchandise, hip hop artists who promoted malt liquor, black radio stations for lacking significant airplay to hip hop, and even the Africans at the onset of the Atlantic slave trade for lacking unity. [40] Chuck D's critical lyrics on the album, interspersed with the surrealism of Flavor Flav,[41] also concern contemporary black life, the state of race relations,[42] and criticisms of institutional racism, White supremacy, and the power elite. [19] In an interview with Stay Free!, Chuck D said: "Public Enemy's music was affected more than anybody's because we were taking thousands of sounds. [32] The recording marked one of the first times in which MCs from different rap crews collaborated,[32] and it led to the Bomb Squad working with Ice Cube on his 1990 debut album AmeriKKKa's Most Wanted. Fear of a Black Planet deftly stated the case for hip-hop as savvy collage art rather than pastiche. And as we started putting together those pieces, the sound got a lot more dense. [31], For the track "Burn Hollywood Burn", Chuck D dealt with clearance issues from different record labels to collaborate with rappers Big Daddy Kane and Ice Cube, who had been pursuing the Bomb Squad to produce his debut album. Only 4 left in stock (more on the way). Their songwriting was partly inspired by the controversy surrounding member Professor Griff and his dismissal from the group in 1989. [7][8][9] The controversial, politically charged lyrics by the group's lead rapper Chuck D, whose braggadocio raps contained references to political figures such as Assata Shakur and Nelson Mandela, as well as endorsements of Nation of Islam-leader Louis Farrakhan, intensified the group's affiliation with black nationalism and Farrakhan. Only 1 left in stock (more on the way). [26] Chuck D said, "Our music is all about samples in the right area, layers that pile on each other. Johnson, a NASA illustrator. Fear of a Black Planet features elaborate sound collages that incorporate varying rhythms, numerous samples, media sound bites, and eccentric loops, reflecting the songs' confrontational tone. The album signaled the coupling of a strongly political message with hip-hop music". Fear of a Black Planet explores themes of organization and empowerment within the black community, social issues affecting African Americans, and race relations at the time. [33], For the album's artwork, Public Enemy enlisted B.E. [41], According to Acclaimed Music, Fear of a Black Planet is the 126th most acclaimed album in history, based on professional rankings of the greatest records. Unreasonable Fear Is Killing Black Men in America—And There's No Justification For It From left: a poster image of Trayvon Martin; a photo of Ahmaud Arbery; a memorial for Philando Castile What You Gonna Do When the Grid Goes Down? We put loops on top of loops on top of loops, but then in the mix we cut things away. [17], The controversy surrounding the group and their exposure through the singles "Fight the Power" and "Welcome to the Terrordome" helped Fear of a Black Planet exceed the sales of their previous two albums, Yo! [6][60], Written by Flavor Flav, Shocklee, Sadler, "911 Is a Joke" features Flav as the main vocalist and criticizes the inadequacy of 9-1-1[51] — the emergency telephone number used in the United States[61] — and the lack of police response to emergency calls in predominantly African-American neighborhoods. [32][63] It also reflects on Flav's experiences with acquaintances from poor neighborhoods. It was released on April 10, 1990, by Def Jam Recordings and Columbia Records. By Tom Breiha n. [22] For the album, they sought to expand on the dense, sample-layered "wall of noise" of Public Enemy's prior album, It Takes a Nation of Millions to Hold Us Back. Eric [Sadler] is coming from a musician's perspective. [13] The Bomb Squad's Hank Shocklee compared their produced sounds, surrounding Chuck D's rhythmic, exhortative baritone voice, to putting "the voice of God in a storm". How You Sell Soul to a Soulless People Who Sold Their Soul? [38], Some tracks used elements from Public Enemy's previous material, which Pete Watrous of The New York Times interpreted as a dual reference to hip hop tradition and the history of the group. Man you ain't gotta Worry 'bout a thing 'Bout your daughter Nah she ain't my type (But supposin' she said she loved me) Rather, it aims to create a collage in which the sampled texts augment and deepen the song/book/art's meaning to those who can decode the layers of meaning. [19] According to Shocklee, "When you're talking about the kind of sampling that Public Enemy did, we had to comb through thousands of records to come up with maybe five good pieces. [13][15], Amid the controversy, Chuck D was given an ultimatum by Schocklee and Stepheny to dismiss Griff from the group or the production deal would fall through. "[27] In his essay on hip hop aesthetics, Richard Schur interpreted such layering as a motif in hip hop and as "the process by which ... new meanings are created and communicated, primarily to an equally knowledgeable audience", concluding that "Public Enemy probably took the ideal of layering to its farthest point". "[30] An analysis by law professors Peter DiCola and Kembrew McLeod estimated that under the sample clearance system that developed after the album's release, Public Enemy were to lose at least five dollars per copy if they were to clear the album's samples at 2010 rates, a loss of five million dollars on a platinum record. As Flav recalled, "I went and got high and wrote the record. [13] "Pollywanacraka" also concerns interracial relations,[51] including Blacks who leave their communities to marry wealthy Whites,[42] and societal views of the matter: "This system had no wisdom / The devil split us in pairs / and taught us white is good, black is bad / and black and white is still too bad". [90] Fear of a Black Planet was nominated for a Grammy Award for Best Rap Performance by a Duo or Group, presented at the 33rd Grammy Awards in 1991. [19] Keith, significant in composing the main tracks and music,[21] received here his first official credit as a team member. 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